Trust your Instruments

Flying is easy! Keep the sky above you and the ground below, point the aircraft in the direction you want to go, look out the window occasionally to know where you are, with towns, lakes roads and so on.  Easy, Right?
During the day time with clear blue skies in small aircraft with Visual Flight Rules (VFR), it is at least. What about at night or in the clouds, fog or rain? Or in big heavy aircraft, travelling at 900km/h? How do pilots know where they are going and not crash into each other?
1stclassIf that question makes you a little anxious while you fly, don’t worry. You can keep sipping your champagne and relax, knowing that your Pilots have studied and trained hard to know where we are and where we are going, using accurate instruments and systems.

For those curious, we do this using Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). A set of rules and navigation systems using; aircraft instrumentation, ground based Navigation beacons and facilities, inertial navigation systems and more recently GPS. Combine with Radar and radio communication procedures with Air Traffic Control, to organise separate and control aircraft. Kind of like an invisible, three dimensional, multi-layer, sky highway. Learning how to fly these “highways” takes a while to master. As always, it starts in the classroom with theory, then simulator or synthetic trainer, a computer simulator where your mistakes don’t kill you. And finally the aircraft, where your mistakes can kill you.

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Synthetic Trainer (Photo IG: aapa_rex )
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Approach procedure chart – Sydney

 

This was my experience
January, the hottest, driest month of the year, and this day was no exception. The air was hot and dry, not a cloud to be seen and I was ready for my first real IFR flight: Mangalore to Shepparton for a few practice approach procedures then back to Mangalore.
I had practised these procedures countless times in the air-conditioned comfort of the Synthetic Trainer and on my computer, using Microsoft Flight Simulator, a very useful study tool,  But I was far from mastering them.
We began taxi by mid-morning, much later in the day than I’d like. The summer sun had begun heating the earth, pushing the temperature past 35 Degrees Celsius, on its way to 40. My shirt already damp from perspiration, the first few buttons open, along with the aircraft door, trying to promote any sort of fresh air flow while we taxied.

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the hood

Things didn’t get much better once we were in flight. The heated earth was sending intense thermals into the sky causing constant turbulence, bouncing our little plane around the sky, requiring constant control input. To make matters worse, I was “under the Hood”. An awkward device that you wear on your head which prevents you from looking out the window, forcing you to use only instruments to fly and navigate.

 

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Piper Warrior PA-28

With frustration and difficulty, I focused on the bouncing instruments, gripping the controls with my sweaty hands. I needed a third hand and a second brain to manage the workload. But all I had was an instructor beside me watching and critiquing, “Altitude, Heading, Tracking, Altitude”
I couldn’t wait to get back on the ground. I persevered, trying not to let the rough conditions frustrate me, taking the sortie one step at a time. The two-hour flight left me physically and mentally exhausted. And I didn’t even see a cloud.
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My first moment flying in clouds, real IMC (instrument conditions), is still very memorable. I remember it so well because it’s burnt deep into my memory, along with a good human factors lesson. Because in that moment I realised how quickly I could kill myself.
My instructor and I were heading towards Melbourne at 6000feet, on my first IFR navigation flight at night. Fortunately, as it was a cool summer night, the air was as smooth as silk.
With my attention focused carefully on the instrument panel of the ‘Autopilot-less’ aircraft, my instructor asks; “Have you flown in cloud yet?” “No, not yet” I reply. “Well, you’re about to,” he says, switching the landing lights on. I lift my eyes, fixating on the illuminated oncoming clouds. There’s something captivating about this moment, as we are swallowed by misty cloudiness for my first time.7
Seconds later I break my fixation and I re-focus on the instruments, finding the aircraft banked 30degress to the left, pitch 5 degrees down, altitude 250 feet low and quickly descending. I yank the controls correcting the attitude and my flight path. The deviation was so gentle I hadn’t even felt it; I was seconds away from a spiral dive and had no clue. I’ve read stories of pilots dying like that!
Now I had a new problem. The aggressive correction as confused my inner ear. It now feels like we are banked 30 degrees right, but my instruments are saying we are straight and level. This spatial disorientation is known as Sensory Illusion or The Leans. Our caveman vestibular system isn’t designed for flight; it can be a dangerous situation for an inexperienced pilot, with the potential of a Graveyard Spiral. This is my first real experience of this illusion. I’ve heard “Trust Your Instruments!” so many times in training that it’s ringing in my head automatically. So do, I trust my instruments and tilt my head to the left to help my ear feel more normal, a tip I had read about in an old theory book.
A long 30 seconds later, I regain my senses. The instructor quietly monitoring me gave me more confidence.  I am still not sure if he, himself a young pilot at only 21years old, was expecting that situation to occur. But it was a valuable lesson.

A week later, Victoria was hit with devastating Bushfires; Black Saturday. 50 Kilometres away, fires raged out of control for weeks, blanketing the state in smoke. When the smoke was thin enough to allow us to take off and land, we were able to fly. The smoke giving an eerie unpredictable environmental condition to fly in. The positive being, it was real instrument conditions and it was better than being under the damn hood

With my training coming to an end and a successful flight test. I took my first flight as an IFR rated pilot. I couldn’t wait to exercise my new licence and fly anywhere without being bound by cloud or rain.

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Canberra ILS procedure

It was a beautiful day heading into Canberra, I was eagerly expecting vectors onto an ILS (instrument approach). Then to my surprise and disappointment, I hear “X-ray Delta India, You’re cleared for a visual Approach runway 35.”  What the hell? I was IFR! – I hadn’t realised this obvious point since we never practised it in IFR training: You can still do a visual approach (a simple VFR procedure) when you’re IFR, as long as you’re in visual conditions (VMC).
After the “WTF?!” moment followed by the “Well Duh” moment, I looked out the window, pointed the aircraft towards the airport and landed. Easy!

 

Tip for the young aviator.
Throughout my career, I have supplemented my flight training with hours and hours of playing Microsoft flight simulator (FSX), even during my training for the 777.
Obviously, you can’t log any of it. But it is a great and affordable training tool. Especially with real flight time or full motion flight simulator time starting around $300 per hour and going into the thousands of dollars per hour. Flight Sim is free after the small purchase cost. You can practice anything from circuits and radio calls to Instrument approaches and procedures, failures, Scan-flows even rehearsing full flights. It gives you a real time learning scenario, with time pressure to force errors and highlight weaknesses and deficiencies which you can learn from.

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FSX Cessna 172. used instead of Piper PA-28
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FSX King Air similar enough to SAAB340 to practice procedures

I highly recommend it if you are studying to be a pilot. Plus, it gives you a break from the books. Just don’t get too distracted trying to get a good score flying the Redbull Air Race.

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PMDG B777 with Virtual CDU on tablet, wirelessly connected to fully program FMC

I highly recommend PMDG, Virtual Avionics and Aerosoft. I used the PMDG Boeing 777 as a training aid and have played with the Aerosoft A320. All buttons and switches function as they do in the real aircraft.
I will use their products again for any other future aircraft I get to fly. Just make sure your computer is powerful enough to run the programs.
https://www.precisionmanuals.com/
http://www.aerosoft.com

First Flight – Going Solo

The first day of flight school is a little bit like the first day of high school. I remember sitting in a new classroom with 20 other new cadets who I’d be spending the next year with, all wearing new uniforms that still didn’t quite fit or feel right. The main difference, I was excited to finally be learning and studying something I was really interested in, that was also directly related to my future goals.

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I also couldn’t wait to start flying!
For 2 months, waiting is exactly what we did!
The flight school was still waiting to receive its AOC (Air Operators Certificate.) Which meant the flight school, wasn’t yet a flight school, legally.  There were students, planes, instructors and classrooms, but no legal piece of paper. This gave me my first lesson in aviation. “Aircraft don’t fly without the right paper.”

There are always teething problems when entering into a new venture. This delay was one of them.
We were REX002, the second ever Regional Express Cadet course, REX001 had started 3 months earlier. Even they were still sitting around waiting for their first flights.
For me, it wasn’t a big problem sitting on my butt playing Microsoft Flight Simulator for 2 months. It wasn’t costing me anything. But for a few of the older guys, they were starting to feel the pressure. They had given up well-paying careers in other industries to pursue their dream career in aviation. They knew they’d have to support their families for another 2 or 3 months longer than expected without a paycheck. I’m not sure how they did it, but they managed.

After two months of poorly utilised time on my behalf, we finally had an AOC. New training aircraft were also arriving every few weeks.198940_1007746234126_9424_n
The first few flying lessons flew by, before I knew it, with no more than 8 hours in my logbook, I was ready to go solo!

Having completed a lesson of circuits (Take-off and landing practice) I taxi the small, single engine aircraft into the apron area with my instructor sitting beside me. Before pulling onto the parking position, he instructs me to, “Just stop the aircraft here.” I set the parking brake. “Do exactly what you just did then to a full stop landing,” he says while unbuckling his seatbelt. He climbs out of the cockpit, closes the door and waves me off with ‘a thumbs up’.

It is a crisp June morning in Mangalore, Victoria. Clear blue winter skies and still air; a perfect day for flying. And I am about to fly solo for the first time!
I take a calming breath in and out to re-focus. I reach down and release the parking brake of the small 4 seater aircraft. “Mangalore Traffic, Piper Warrior, xray delta echo, taxing for circuits, Runway Three-Six” I broadcast over the radio. The aircraft creeps forward under the pull of the Idling propeller. One hand on the throttle, the other on the yoke, my feet placed on the rudder and brake pedals controlling direction and speed. I start my pre-take-off safety checks as I have rehearsed many times before. I am back in the zone.
Lining up on the runway, I take another deep breath to settle my nerves and focus.

I push the throttle all the way forward; the engine roars with full power. Without the 70 kilogramme instructor beside me weighing the aircraft down, it accelerates faster than I’m used to. “Airspeed alive”, at 60 knots I rotate. The aircraft leaps into the air, I set the attitude and before I know it I’m on the downwind leg of the circuit at 1000feet Untitledabove the ground. I glance to my right to see an empty seat. I smile to myself, I’m flying solo!  –  I still have to land this thing and that’s the hard part! So I get back to work. I perform me before landing checks like a well-programmed robot, I manoeuvre onto base then final, rolling out on the centre line and selecting the last stage of flaps. The picture looks good. I just need to keep it on the runway centreline and stable.

I close the throttle over the fence gliding the little plane onto the runway. I can’t remember whether it was with a smooth touchdown with a gentle squeak of the tyres or a rough thud. Probably a thud, but I didn’t care I had landed safely! And as they say, “any landing you walk away from is a good landing.”

I pull the aircraft off the runway on to the first taxiway, perform my after landing checks and bring the aircraft to a stop on its parking position in front of the Instructor and shut down the engine.
I fling the door open and climb out; I feel like Tom Cruise in that scene from Top Gun, where Maverick climbs out of his F-14 Tomcat for the last time! giphy

That famous electric guitar riff is playing in my head. Disappointingly the Instructor doesn’t say that I can be his “Wingman any time.” But he congratulates me and shakes solomy hand. I guess that’ll do.

Every pilot’s first solo flight is a very memorable milestone. That night we made a tradition of swimming a lap of the freezing pool in uniform. That tradition lasted a whole month until the pool was drained for maintenance over winter.

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As 2008 wore on, we experienced many more disruptions as the school struggled its way through infancy.
The Australian aviation industry was beginning to watch us like Guinee pigs. Qantas had just abandoned their cadet program. While our flying academy was going through organisation and ownership changes; transitioning from Civil Aviation Training Academy (CATA) to Australian Airline Pilot Academy (AAPA). This included new managers and chief pilot.
There was quite a lot of doubt and controversy; everyone seemed to have their opinion. It was a hot topic on PPRUNE (Professional Pilot Rumour Network). We didn’t know what lay ahead or what to expect. But this was all part of being amongst the first to try something new. So I just stuck with it; we were making progress at least. And that was the main thing.
AAPA eventually established a new home in Wagga Wagga in 2009 where it has matured into a top quality flight academy.

I progressed from my first solo flight to navigation flights and completing theory exams. Then also onto failing a flight test and getting myself lost somewhere in the countryside, it happens to the best of us. I’ll tell you about it next time.

Planned Route – Where am I going!

There I was; at the beginning of 2008, fresh out of High School, hardly an adult with an amazing opportunity in my hands.  And sitting in front of me was the scariest, most adult looking contract I had ever seen. I was about to sign a 7-year employment contract and bond, plunging myself into ninety-thousand dollars (AUD) of debt.
I only had seven thousand dollars to my name, for which I had been working all summer in a factory and a piece of crap car, worth no more than four thousand bucks. What’s more, I would be committed to the one airline until I was 27-years old.

What was I getting myself into? How did I know this was the best option for me?

For those who are about to start your flying career. We all know there are a number of different pathways; from Airforce/Military, Airline Cadetships, University and General Aviation, just to name a few of the common ones. And they all come with their pros and cons.
So what would I recommend?
Knowing what I know now, my first piece of advice is: There will always be people who argue that one pathway is better than another. It is important to remember, these people will often argue what is better for them! Not necessarily for you and your goals. Still, take their advice, but realise where they might be different from you. An easy way to do this is; ask them to go through the pros and cons, quietly keeping in mind that it is a pro or con in their opinion. Then make your own list of pros and cons based on your values. This way you can use their knowledge in the most effective way for you.

Secondly: Ask yourself why. “Why do I even want to be a Pilot? Why is it so appealing?” Really dig deep, once you have this “why”, write it down. Your “why”, is your motivational fuel. It will help keep you motivated with the many challenges you will face during your career. So make it easy to revisit and remember why. (It is also a common airline interview question.)
You’ll know it’s the right “why” when saying and thinking about it makes you smile to yourself and feel excited or nervous. It still does for me.sunrise I’ll be sitting there having a quiet moment to myself, watching a beautiful sunrise from 35,000 feet. And I’ll remember; I am in control of a Boeing 777! A 300million dollar, 300ton, technologically mind-blowing flying machine! Hauling across the sky and around the world at Mach 0.84(900km/h). Powerful, Free and Adventurous!
I belong to a small percentage of people in the world who will ever get to experience and explore the world from this perspective.20170519_002110 (I used to have similar moments at 15000feet in a 13ton SAAB340 or 5000ft in a PA-28)

I also enjoy the process of learning and forever developing and applying the skills of my profession. As pilots we take pride in that, we understand and appreciate that we are a part of a highly trained team. I guess it’s a professional pride thing, or just ego (kidding).  But we all understand in the back of our minds that we’re responsible for the 450 lives sitting behind us. It is our job to deliver them safely, connecting them to their friends and families, homes, dream holidays and workplaces.
If you’re only motivated by “MONEY”, trust me, there are easier and more efficient ways to get rich. Don’t waste time in aviation. Or even if it’s for business class staff travel. Okay Maybe Business Cass is a motivator; it’s just so comfortable and amazing! I’m so clearly spoiled now.
So what is your “why?” Will it fuel you and give you the endurance you need?

Your “why” should help you with the next question:  Where do you see yourself in 10years? Flying a wide body jet around the world? A narrow body domestically? Or a float plane in the Caribbean or Whitsundays?
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Where do you want your career to take you? Then work backwards. What experiences do you want to have along the way? And for that 10-year goal to happen, Where and Who do you need to be, in 5 years from now? In 2 years from now? 1year, 6 months and 1 week from now? Who do you need to be right now and what do you need to do today, to put yourself on the path to your goal? It might be studying for an upcoming test at high school, setting goals or sending off job applications.

You need to know where you are now, where you want to end up, and the path you wish to take that connects the two.
I never start a flight without a map and flight plan. Your career shouldn’t be any different. Oh, And your plan doesn’t even need to be perfect. You just need to have one.

If you fail to plan, you’re planning to fail – Benjamin Franklin

Lastly:   APPLY FOR EVERYTHING!  Take every opportunity offered.  You can always turn one down if you have to and maybe you’ll be lucky enough to have two or three offers to choose from in the end.
The question that that annoys me the most is: “Which cadetship or job should I apply for?”
All of them I say! Why are you trying to choose from options you haven’t even been offered yet!?
In the same way, we never leave the ground without having an alternate route or landing airport available. My career has been no different. I’ve re-planned, re-routed, been delayed and even shortcuts that I hadn’t even expected! But I always created options by applying for everything I might want.

So how did I know the Regional Express cadet program was right for me?
Well firstly, I didn’t have many other options.
Secondly, I weighed up the pros, cons and risks. Had my friends’ lawyer Step Dad read over the contract and give me some free legal advice. Then I asked myself; where I dream of being in 5 and 10 years? Then I trusted my gut and signed the dotted line, starting the engines of my career.

You’re the Captain of your life. It is up to you to take command of your future. Navigate it in the right direction!
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I know I promised to share about my experience of surviving flight school as well, but I’ll save that for next week. I hope you found value in this post and that it gives you some tools in how to become a pilot, or even just pursuing any goals you might have in life.

Pre-flight – The Beginning

 As a child, flying captivated my imagination; it seemed powerful, free and adventurous. It also seemed out of my reach as a career.
Fast forward to 18 years old, still captivated by flight, I received the heartbreaking letter, informing me that I was; “unfit for pilot selection in the Royal Australian Air Force.” I have been Asthmatic since I was a child, and I still am. This crushed my dreams.
After finishing my final year of High School, I was accepted into University for Mechanical Engineering; I was due to start in February. But my flying dreams were still lingering. By this stage, I had already taken a couple of casual flying lessons at my local flying school. When my instructor suggested, “Why don’t you just do a commercial pilot course?” for some reason, I thought the Airforce was the only way to get into the Airlines.
I came home to tell my Mother. She being just as ignorant on the topic, replied, “Okay, do some research and then tell me about it.” I’ve been lucky enough to have parents, who support me, but they also had me to do things for myself, rather than being spoon fed.
So I got to work researching, or more accurately Google Searching “How to become a pilot” and “Commercial pilot courses.” I also managed to organise an interview with a Qantas pilot who my instructor knew, for some advice. This is where I learned about Pilot Cadet Programs. Sadly, for that year, I had missed out on applying for the Qantas program by only 2 months. (This actually turned out to be a blessing, because 8 months later; the Qantas cadet program was abandoned!)
Then sometime around late December 2007 I Google searched: Pilot Cadetships Australia.  That’s when I first heard of REX (Regional Express.) They had just started a cadet program; I put together an application and sent it off. I also applied to Cathay Pacific who was also starting a cadet program.

By mid-January, I had made my mind up. I was going to spend 2008 learning to fly, one way or another. I Deferred university for the year and began calling each day the recruitment office for Cathay and Rex. Turns out everyone is on summer holidays that time of year. Then finally, on Thursday the 24rd of January 2008, REX returned my call. My persistence had paid off! That call had me jump in front of the 1200 other applicants ahead of me. I was offered an interview for the following Tuesday!

With such short notice, fortunately, I had spent the last 3 weeks researching (more Google searching) “Regional Express” “Saab340” “Turboprop” “how turboprops work” ”WOMBAT test.” So I felt prepared. In hindsight, I think what got me through was my enthusiasm and honesty, more than my knowledge.

2 weeks later I was off to Adelaide to interview for the Cathay Program. The interview went terribly! I totally blew it. Luckily, I could write this off as a learning experience; the day before this interview, Rex offered me a position! I was due to start on the 7th of April!

This is where my career started. I took the opportunity Rex gave me with both hands and went for it.

In my next post, I will discuss how to become a pilot. I’ll also share my experience in a cadet program and Flight School; where I spent the next year of my life studying and flying light aircraft to gain my CPL and MECIR.

In future posts, I will continue my story from simulator and line training, my career with Rex, maturing as a person and a professional, becoming a Captain, Interviewing for a major airline, moving city and country. I’ll share my successes and failures, lessons learned hints and tips. I’ll also discuss relevant news in aviation and what my life is like as a pilot, Jet setting around the world in a Boeing 777.

 

Image: boeing.com

 

Send me questions and feedback so I can give you better information.